University of Washington IT Workshop

October 11-13, 2002

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Friday, October 11

5-7 p.m. Participants arrive, check in (note: no dinner provided)
7:30 p.m. Welcome and introductions
7:50 p.m. Carousel
  1. What is active learning?
  2. Why do active learning?
  3. What evidence will you accept that student understanding is improving?
  4. What barriers or constraints limit active learning at your institution?
  5. What are your individual and team goals during FIRST II?
8:50 p.m. Carousel Wrap-up
9:30 p.m. Adjourn for the evening

Saturday, October 12

7:30 a.m. Breakfast
8:00 a.m. Field Exercise I: Does biodiversity increase as forests age?
  1. Introduction
  2. Data collection by teams
9:00 a.m. Field Exercise II: Open-ended investigation
  1. Introduction
  2. Data colledtion
10:00 a.m. Break
10:20 a.m. Field exercise I: data analysis and reporting
10:50 a.m. Field exercise II: data analysis and reporting
11:20 a.m. Field Exercise Wrap-up
  • Evaluating the exercise from a student's and professor's point of view
  • Assessment how to's
  • Transfer: roundtables on adding inquiry-based exercises to a course you teach
12:00 noon Lunch
1:00 p.m. What is FIRST II?
  • Organization and plan (FS1, FS2, ITs, etc.)
  • Project goals
  • Project timeline
  • Website
1:30 P.m. Active Learning in Action - A Grab Bag of Examples
  1. Peer Teaching (think/pair/share)
    • Introduction
    • Mazur tape
    • Evaluating the technique from a student's and professor's point of view
    • Information on student response devices (keypads)
    • Transfer: reoundtables on what to do in your course
2:00 p.m. Break
2:30 p.m.

Active Learning in Action (continued)

  1. Continue with peer teaching, if needed
  2. Group work in class

    • Brief lecture
    • Case history hand-outs on species interactions or natural selecton in action
    • Do the exercise - participants as students
    • Evaluating the exercise from a student's and professor's point of view
    • Transfer: roundtables on what to do in your course
  1. Addressing Misconceptions: The radish experiment

    • Introduction
    • Do the exercise - participants as students
    • Evaluationg the exercise from a student's and professor's point of view
    • Transfer: roundtables on what to do in your course
  1. Minute Papers

    • Introduction
    • Do several (muddiest point, write an exam question, state a hypothesis to explain data presented, interpret graph, identify most central concept learned, etc.) - participants as students
    • Evaluating the exercise from a student's and professor's point of view
    • Transfer: roundtables on what to do in your courses

5:00 p.m. Free time
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Social Hour
  • Assignment: Write down what you will try or think about before the February workshop
  • How to sustain your team?: post-its and reporting

Sunday, October 13

7:00 a.m. Breakfast
8:00 a.m. Wrap-up brainstorming session
  • Evaluating the workshop
  • Ideas for the February workshop
9:30 a.m. Leave for home